Afghanistan Central:

August 21st, 2011

Afghanistan Central:

Qala Bist.com Reconstruction:

Qala Bist.com has grown a lot as a website since this post on October 6, 2007 was written.   A lot has been written here about Afghanistan and about my experiences in Afghanistan and those of my family and others in Afghanistan, with emphasis on the years 1958 through 1960.

It is anticipated that more will be written, more information will be posted and that more documents and more pictures will be posted too.

The most ambitious project so far has been the effort to post my parents letters to and from Afghanistan.  The series is entitled “Going to Afghanistan“, a Qala Bist.com Category.

The “Going to Afghanistan” series of posts contains not only letters, but also observations, explanations and commentary of my own.  In addition, pictures (photographs) of Afghanistan, documents regarding Afghanistan and various lists and timelines (Tepplines) have been added to the “topic Afghanistan” content.

A Category approach is the best way to meet the needs of a wide diversity of readers, and of readers interests.  In order to read the “Going to Afghanistan” posts sequentially one should scroll down to Post #1, read it, and then work their way forward through time.  It takes time, but every post is sequentially there.

Donald Clayton. 

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Format, Dates and Times:

Various variations of format have been used at Qala Bist.com over the years.  Afghanistan information will be progressively updated to reflect the current format and usage conventions, hopefully misspellings will be corrected.  Usage conventions prefer the avoidance of abbreviations.  Generally, dates given are the dates of the locality of where the letter or information originated at the time.  Qala Bist.com post dates reflect Albuquerque local time.  When a time and date appear at the bottom of a post the date and time are UTC time, based on the minute of the upload to the web.

Copyright and Links:

The content on this website is copyrighted based on the actual date of posting unless there is a specific statement that the specific item or specific content is a part of the Public Domain.  All “old” letters and photographs published on this site have not been previously published unless a specific statement to the contrary is made.  All rights are reserved by the author of this site.  Some content is designated “Qala Bist Blue“.  Qala Bist Blue content is either a part of the public domain or is dedicated to the public domain with certain provisions that include credit (source attribution), non-religious usage of portrait type photographic content, and a prohibition of any sale or attempted sale of the Qala Bist.com image.

Links to this site, “Qala Bist.com”, or to an individual page are always welcome.

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List of American Nationals in Afghanistan in 1958 through 1960

The “List of Americans in Kabul, Afghanistan 1958 – 1960” is a comprehensive and growing list of “all” Americans and others that were in Afghanistan from 1958 through 1960.  The list may contain additional information or links regarding the people referenced in documents, photographs or letters.

The list also contains the names of various nationals of other nations who were closely involved with Americans or American affairs in Afghanistan.  This second category is and will be incomplete, but expresses the international diversity of the times.

Access the “List of American Nationals in Afghanistan in 1958 through 1960HERE.

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2011.08.26 – 19:34.

Kabul, Afghanistan: May 16, 1960

May 16th, 1960


________________________________________________________________________

AIR LETTER

Addressed to:
Hemme Martin
149 No. Forest Street
Gilroy, California

[Stamps removed:  Typed message underneath: Please send this letter on.  Important.]

Senders name and address:
(rubber stamp)
FRED W. CLAYTON
c/o American Embassy / USOM-Kabul
Department of State Mail Room
Washington 25, D.C.
(letter) #10

________________________________________________________________________

Kabul, Afghanistan
May 16, 1960

Dear Family,

If you want letters, this time you are going to have to have some carbons, or I shall never catch up on my writing again for a while.  Everyone here is well, including three humans, two ducks, one cat, and three dogs of assorted sizes; and, I suppose, I should add three bacchas {Pharsi for “boys”*}, but, by doing that I imply they are not in the human class and that would be an error.  Well, anyway, this is remarkable mostly because the first three mentioned items were missing for eight days.

Before last week there was a hint from my husband that he might go to Herat by road to check it for equipment transport even though he was sure the acting mission director might highly disapprove.   Thus he started off by Dodge Personnel Carrier (this is just like a jeep almost, but 3/4 ton instead of 1/2 ton – it is quite the bright yellow vehicle – capable of a considerable number of wonders, like traveling under water, etc.) for Kandahar leaving me with secret instructions to get consular permission for me and Donald to go to Herat if it became possible, but not to let the secret slip to ICA {International Cooperation Administration*}.  The consul has to notify the foreign office of RGA {Royal Government of Afghanistan}, and Fred did not even have permission and this upset the consul a great deal.  On the 7th I finally flew to Kandahar with Donald after several radio exchanges in a form of code with father* to verify the fact that I could come.   All of this produced enough tension for me to make a whodunit – plus some other information I had acquired in my little hollow head that was very critical.  It took 2/3 of the way to Kandahar on a bumpy flight before my cares started to roll away.  When father* met us at the airport, I felt better.  The new Ariana DC-6 had come in that same day from Europe with Amanullah‘s body.  In Kabul we saw the other five of Ariana’s planes, so it was quite a day.  The airport {in Kandahar} is longer than Mingaladon*, although not quite as wide strips.

For two days Donald and I just loafed around in the summer climate while father* finished unexpected business.  It was very relaxing.  On Tuesday {at 3:00 A.M.} we three started out for Herat in company with another vehicle the same.  We did the full 400 miles that day, in some cases going up and down as mich as we went horizontally.  A little over 15 hours got us there, beat but unbowed.  Father* was happy because the road would support the heaviest equipment, and he could move Herat ahead.  {the} (air project)  We gulped choi and fell into bed and I never knew the beds in Herat could be so easily slept in, big full pillows, saggy springs and all.  The next morning we were up early and toured the bazaars looking for motor oil, and by ten had oil, had checked the airport and were on our way back to Lash Kar Gah {Lashkar Gah}.  This time we did not have to wait and check up on our companion car and we had no fuel pump troubles and it was about fifty miles shorter so we didn’t take quite twelve hours for the trip.  If I had had time to take pictures, make notes, etc. I could have had a nice article for the {National} geographic about our motor trip across the southern part of the least known country in south Asia.  The plains are terrific, the mountains are magnificent and one looks like it is made of solid white marble.  One village only had date palms and looked like an oasis.  Farah is in a very rich valley.  I suppose one might find that about 10 cars a day use the road on an average.  If I ever get caught up on 9 days of diary, that will be the closest I come to writing the article.  This was one of father’s* quicker trips.

We stayed overnight at the welcome staff house in Lash Kar Gah; the next morning father* did business in Girish {now: Gereshkmap}, and Changiers {now: Char e Anjirs}, running around with Donald, but letting me rest.  In the afternoon we went to Kandahar through the two mile wide swarm of big yellow locusts which is beginning to worry a lot of people.  There are some other groups too.  By dinner time we were there, but not ready for the planned Friday departure because we had a broken shock absorber and a few other minor troubles.  Friday, even father* rested a considerable portion of the day and began to relax.  He did have to get out of bed in the afternoon to receive a radio call from Mr. Hyde.  Hyde wanted to report that the equipment father* had ordered moved from Kandahar to Kabul had finally arrived in Kabul.  The orders had been given in defiance of the impossible “let’s wait a while” attitude that Washington and the mission have been delaying father’s* projects with.  We have to DO SOMETHING in this country.  The procession of clean, bright yellow equipment with USA and Afghan flags ahead of it reached on Jody Ma Wand {Road: also: Jad-i-Maiwand Avenue} from the Chaman {River, in Kart-i-Char, Kabul} and clear back to the Ariana offices before our usual turn {See Parade: below}.  The rock crushers were huge and so were the graders and 10 ton trucks and other things I can’t name.  Seldom has such a wonderful sensation been created in Kabul.  It took days to get steel to reinforce the Logar River bridge, but it was safe and the crossing made and the whole enterprise seems to have been worth while.  The rest of Friday father* really relaxed.  We had a barbecue with Goos and went to bed relaxed.

Saturday morning we really did not get up early compared to the three A.M. of Tuesday, but we were on our way at seven as planned to drive to Kabul.  We had finished our 315 miles by 7:30 that night, including time out for our flat tire.  Fortunately every where we traveled we had good weather and especially dry roads.  The trip from Kandahar to Kabul was beautiful as our very wet spring has made everything particularly green and the road goes through lots of nice valleys.  The south was hot, but not to hot.  We kept our car windows down and the air and dust whisked through my hair until I looked and felt like a witch when I got here, but most of the damage has been repaired now and I can go ahead with the routines.

In this country there are no routines.  Today Wollmar returned from his call to Washington and we all want to know why he was called there anyway – the bets are he is to be replaced.  In a few days the Ambassador returns from his consultation there.  Today the new Transportation Officer got to Bangkok and gets here at an indefinite time in the future, but is on his way.  It still is not clear whether he will take over the transportation projects or if father’s* position continues as is.  Anyway, a cable says the Assignment Board is considering father’s* request for a reassignment based on the assumption the Division is to be reorganized into two as Washington has suggested.  When the new FWC gets here, we have to give him a big party anyway.  So, I say there is no routine to this place.

I had better sit down and write the nine missing days of diary so I can add the rest of the story.  It is better than a novel and none of us looks the worse for wear.  Father and I are both at good weight levels, looking young and sassy, and Donald is suddenly becoming a lot huskier.

Lots of love to everyone.

Lloydine & Fred & Donald

________________________________________________________________________
Notes of explanation or clarification:

Father*  is Fred W. Clayton, Lloydine’s husband and father of Donald (in Afghanistan), Kenneth (in Reno, Nevada) and “Freddie” (Frederick Martin Clayton in Redlands, California).  Lloydine has adopted the use of father to avoid referencing Fred in letters that may be intercepted by parties unknown.

boys  (Persian: bacchas) refers to the “household help” (the “servants”).  In our case there were three: Gulam, the cook; Abdul, the houseboy and Agbar, the gardener.  They slept in unattached quarters near the back door of the house.

Mingaladon*  is the airport that Fred W. Clayton “built” in Rangoon, Burma circa 1951 and 1952.  During six very intense and critical months of construction he was the Chief Engineer, leaving Burma just after the first passenger jet service by BOAC Comet reached Asia.  The Mingaladon (aerodrome) concrete runway was the longest in Asia at the time of completion in 1951. 

Parade:  Fred Clayton always liked parades.  He was always impressed by what could be learned from them, how they captured people’s imagination, how they often got everyone on the same page.  The only parades at that time in Kabul were the annual military parade and the occasional motorcade parades that attended a visiting foreign dignitary, usually a head of state.  There were no marathons.

There were very few pieces of heavy construction equipment in the country.  Most roadwork had always been done by hand in Afghanistan, little changed in method from the days of Rome and the building of the Appian Way.  The Americans did things differently.  The secret was in the construction equipment, most of which nobody in Afghanistan had ever seen.  Fred wanted the average person in the street, on the streets of Kabul the capital, to see it.

The history of foreign aid to Afghanistan was that the Russians provided aid in the cities, where it was easily seen.  In Kabul they gave Afghanistan municipal buses.  They built a large and impressive grain silo and attendant bakery, “the Russian Bakery” where the wheat that America gave during a famine naturally went – there was no other place to put it.  The Russians were credited with feeding the people.  The Russians always “won” the peace in Afghanistan.  The Americans spent (gave Afghanistan) far more money; but it was spent on building “dams in the desert”, canals in the back country, seemingly unnecessary “roads to nowhere, through nowhere” and then there was the occasional airport (too) that just served to remind most Afghans that only the rich and the rulers could ever afford to fly.

Fred’s idea was that one parade might help change it, meaning the image of America that the Afghans had.  The Ambassador was away, the Mission Director was away and Fred and his family were enroute from Kandahar when Fred’s parade happened; although it had been carefully planned.

It was a hit of course.  It helped take people’s minds off the U-2 incident and the American prisoner of war Francis Gary Powers held in Russia.  The U-2 had been downed on the 1st.  The “NASA denial” was on the 5th.  On the 7th Khrushchev revealed that he had the plane, the cameras, the pilot.  Fred’s parade of American construction equipment through the center of Kabul was on the 14th.  The immediate crisis then passed.

The Chaman River passes through Kart-i-Char Kabul about a mile west and southwest of where the Mariwand Road begins near the Kabul River.  The road from Kandahar (then) came in near the southern end of Daruleman Avenue, the equipment may have gone north on Alibad Road (now: Pul-e-Surkh Road) until it reached Sher Shar Mina Avenue that runs east-west toward the center of Kabul to the east.  The equipment may have just gone straight down Duruleman (meaning north) to the gates of the prison before it turned east.  I don’t know.  I wasn’t there that day until after the parade was over.

What I do know is that it was a mile long stream (perhaps more) of some of the best construction equipment of the time painted in a very bright yellow, the Morrison Knudsen colors of the time.

2013.05.02. – 23.55.

Kabul, Afghanistan: April 19, 1960

April 19th, 1960


________________________________________________________________________

AIR LETTER

Addressed to:
Hemme Martin
149 No. Forest Street
Gilroy, California

Senders name and address:
(rubber stamp)
FRED W. CLAYTON
c/o American Embassy / USOM-Kabul
Department of State Mail Room
Washington 25, D.C.
(letter) #9

________________________________________________________________________

Kabul, Afghanistan
April 19, 1960

Dear Family, – Kenneth, Freddie, Grandma,

Maybe someday you will get a letter from us and we shall get one from you if this interminable rain ever stops.  It has been raining here for so long that we have been thinking in terms of Noah and how to build an ark.  Actually we have our ark pretty well ready, but I will get to that later.  The facts seem to be that it has been raining for seven days and the clouds are very low this morning.  However, we think this might be a thick, rising fog as there is no rain falling.  A while back I wrote that they were allowing the use of Bagram airport with its paved runways for commercial flights now during the wet weather and during construction of the Kabul airport.  However, paving does not help if one cannot see the mountain tops around about as flying here is strictly on a visual basis.  Result is that there have been no planes coming or going for days.

Last Saturday father*, Hyde, and Sanger finally got off to Kandahar on his second try.  On Monday Bert Hyde got a plane back into Kabul, the only one that has flown since the 9th.  Father* was supposed to return on Thursday as we had a small, special dinner planned for them.   That morning the Delhi plane took off, but returned after an hour of flying because it could not get through the Ghazni pass.  Since the 11th people have been accumulating in Kandahar, Kabul, Amritsar and other places waiting to go someplace else.  I am glad it did not develop this way last year or we would still be sitting in Amritsar waiting for our “April 12” arrival in Kabul.  There have been a lot of parties in Kabul either given without the guest of honor (in transit) or cancelled because he did not arrive.  I went to one, and of course our dinner on Thursday went on without father*.  I heard a few days ago that there were over fifty people accumulated in Kabul.  Then there is the mail and shipping, etc.  It will take Ariana a long time to get out from under this.  One of the sad things is that two or three of the planes are grounded at Bagram where there are no mechanical facilities or storage sheds.  Otherwise the time could have been in to do some much needed mechanical work.  One wonders how Ariana can survive even with subsidies, yet we need it so desperately.

Father* could not wait in Kandahar forever so on Thursday afternoon at one he took a “Dodge Personnel Carrier” – magnified jeep made for the navy so it can even go on lake bottoms, four wheel drive, extra gears, big wheels etc., brand new for one of the projects – and started to Kabul with a couple of other people.  86 miles out of Kandahar they picked up an Austrian trying to do it in a little Russian car taxi.  He had a three hour head start on them already.  So in about thirteen hours of travel time they got to Kabul.  They managed to average about 25 miles per hour, starting with 28 per hr. on the first stretch that was in relatively good condition.  This vehicle is our “ark”, and one could figure it would get through almost any place.

Sunday we took this vehicle down the gorge road a ways to see the busy river crashing its way through.  There is such a high silt content that the water does not exactly churn like clear water, but splinters into small droplets everywhere it meets obstacles.  It was busily chewing away at the road some places and we are sure that by now in some of the places where it was already working behind the retaining walls the road must be gone.  The Lataband Pass {map} was working for a while although rumors have it that it was closed by slides.  There were some bad ones in the gorge too.  So, if mail is slow, you see why.

We are all well although father* got very tired on his long drive in the rain and dark.  He has been busy documenting all of his problems for Mr. Cawlthorn who is supposedly due in Washington on the 18th of April.  I have been semi-retired working on patching the family clothes – and this is a big job since it has not been touched for the last year.  I enjoy it in the rain.  Half of my time is taken up with cleaning up after the dogs, but they are still cute.  Sheelah is supposed to be a long hair I have learned.

Boys, you will get a big kick out of this.  Kidston railroaded a commissary meeting into voting that this one should affiliate with the Karachi one.  Eve was not even told much about it and said the action was really crudely done.  Now the latest scope is that Karachi refuses to have us, saying it would take $60,000.00 to put into the order they want us in.  Also, the Embassy has taken the warehouse space so they have to operate out of ICA warehouses on this side of town.  Oh joy!

{Page #2}

Mother, I hope you got your desert trip.

To go back to the old questions.  I did not bother to pay Copenhavers again as it was done by then.  I had paid American express on Sept. 5, air mail.  I have never used your address on anything on any of the forms we have had except for the Carson City post office.  Anything you have forwarded to us we have changed to this address – this particularly would apply to American Express.  The one exception is the Grollier Society books.  I explained to you and to them carefully, that last year we received one book “Book of Knowledge Annual” before we left Carson and I sent them a check for that.  I never received any other and the billing you eventually forwarded showed the Harrison St. address, so I presume that is where the book went and it was probably returned by the P.O. to them.  There should be two books each spring, and they are very interesting to read them and save.  My letter to them was very clear after you finally sent me the report on it all.

I am glad to notice that my letters seem to be coming to you better now that I have complained to your post office and started putting my “guilty conscience” notes under the stamps.  Someone sure made a haul last fall on the stamps.

No gardens here yet, everything is drowned out.  Lots of the mud walls are down and much trouble for the people.

Much Love from all of us.

Fred & Lloydine & Donald

________________________________________________________________________
Notes of explanation or clarification:

Father* is Fred W. Clayton, Lloydine’s husband and father of Donald (in Afghanistan), Kenneth (in Reno, Nevada) and “Freddie” (Frederick Martin Clayton in Redlands, California).    The letter to Hemme (her mother; “Grandma”) is the original, Kenneth and Freddie receive carbon copies of Page #1 of the same letter.  Lloydine has adopted the use of father to avoid referencing Fred in letters that may be intercepted by parties unknown.  Ghazni Pass is also known as Batai Pass.

2013.04.30 – 17:30.

Kabul, Afghanistan: April 9, 1960

April 9th, 1960


________________________________________________________________________

AIR LETTER

Addressed to:
Hemme Martin
149 N. Forest St.
Gilroy, California

Senders name and address:
(rubber stamp)
FRED W. CLAYTON
c/o American Embassy / USOM-Kabul
Department of State Mail Room
Washington 25, D.C.
(letter) #8

________________________________________________________________________

April 9, 1960

Dear Mother,

This is to be a short letter, but just to say everyone is well.

The two puppies keep us busy but we really enjoy them.  They are such personalities.

Fred is off to Kandahar today after trying to get there yesterday.  The winds made landing visibility too little so they had to return after being more than half way there.

Spring is peaking around the corner here.  Thanks for the news on the dresses, etc.  I am glad you got your dress done.  I finally finished a wool housecoat I have been working on for about two weeks.  It is late, but I was determined to get it sewed even if I couldn’t wear it.  Mostly I have to sew things into different sizes and lengths, and now it is too late to rework my winter things.  I don’t need new things.  However, we all like to hear word about new styles.

Maybe you are in the desert now.  Bet it is hot.

Gilroy must be going arty now.  We shall bring back two originals from here, one is our  sketch (educated scribbling), the other an oil by Mme Choukour of Afghan mountains, a gift.

News of the Sly visit was all new.

Did you get my letter asking for a complete itemization of all things paid by you for us?  The records are mixed up and I must have this list.  I have sent letters that were poorly numbered, but in general they are as follows:  February 12, Feb. 27, Feb. 29, Mar 16, Mar. 29, Apr. 9.

My diary is a mixture of the frivolous and serious.  I’ll try to get it out with me if I ever have to leave in a hurry.  It is purposely written in a manner that is hard to seperate.  You’ll perish trying to read it.

Groceries are just terribly high by the time they get to this inland part of the world.  Commodity losses are almost 30% enroute, due to rain and other damages.

I have been doing tax report and owing them as usual.  Have been sewing and have neglected my other projects for almost a month.

Almost time to think about going home again, especially when it comes to selling things, and doing your own packing etc.

Will close to catch the mail now.  Much love from all of us.

Fred & Lloydine & Donald

________________________________________________________________________
Notes of explanation or clarification:

2013.04.30 – 04:32.

Carson City, Nevada: November 12, 1958

November 12th, 1958

________________________________________________________________________

AIR LETTER – AEROGRAMME – PAR AVION
Pre-stamped U.S. Postage 10c (with a four engine prop plane pictured)

Addressed to:
Mr. Fred W. Clayton
American Embassy – USOM Kabul
Department of State Mail Room
Washington 25, D.C.

Senders name and address:
Lloydine Clayton
405 N. Roop St.
Carson City, Nevada
U.S.A.
________________________________________________________________________

November 12, 1958

Dearest Fred,

Your assignments are a challenge and I particularly like the one on ski lifts, so this letter is devoted to that subject.  I contacted Warren Hart for the information.  He is at Reno Ski Bowl now.  He sends his best regards and greetings to you; says he hasn’t seen you for a long time.  Van Evers is in S.F.

A jeep should offer adequate power for a rope tow, something about a rear end lock.  Maximum length would be about 1000’ of tow – twice that much rope.  In manila rope of 1” diameter you would have about 10% stretch, so remember that in placing the lower end of the lift.  1” diameter is best for a lift used by adults, altho he has ½” on a 200’ tow used for the beginners, kids.  The newest and best is polyethylene rope, although expensive – no moisture pick-up, no glove wear, no sudden grip effect, lighter weight, longer wear etc. etc.

Slope is determined by those using it and their ability to stand up with the pull.

I talked with him yesterday and this morning and drove up and took quite a few pictures, which I will send tomorrow if they come out.

Your power should be at the top, although it can be at the bottom if you have a way to take up the slack that would build up behind the skier.  He uses rubber lined wheels with 3 grooves on the drive and 2 grooves on the idler.  18” – 20” diameter is all right, although nothing against a larger size.  One suggestion is a large truck tire of 3’ diameter with the tire, cut a groove in the ply if it is thick enough and presto a rubber lined wheel.

For the overhead return wheels wheelbarrow wheels are dandy.

On the short lift he has the lower end standing free, but on a longer one it has a steel cable fastened to a pole to take in the slack with.  The lower wheel is inside the frame which rides free so it can slide on the snow, and can be lifted up to the snow surface at each successive fall, the framework protects hands if someone inadvertently grabs the wrong rope and gets dragged towards the wheel.

The power source is on a wooden platform, high enough for anticipated snow, or almost, it seems.

The return support poles are not in a straight line, but 5’ out in a 200’ and 11’ out in his longer lift.  This is a safety measure to assure people not falling into them.  The return wheels have a little horizontal bar to keep the rope from jumping out of the groove.  These poles are steel with climbers on them, well above snow line and 2’ in concrete.  Small support ropes on pulleys hook under the lower rope to hold it out of the snow when the tow is not in use, or even higher in the off season.  Cash cost of the smaller tow with all new materials and hired labor would be about $600, but self help saves a lot.

I was going to draw a picture, but think my words suffice for the time being.

I wasn’t so successful on the drug store.  McDonald says he is too old and settled and evidently his son couldn’t go it alone.  Ike Cochran is working for Shrine top in 3 years and won’t make a move until after that in any circumstances.  Lonnie Truell was most interested, but I did not encourage him as he is not an experienced business man, just a pharmacist with Ike.  I’m going to talk with Homer on Friday.

Did you get to stop at Mingaladon?  You have never said.

I notice moist places on the hills above the Kabul river in your pictures – not exploited yet!

I want a snow leopard for a pet.

Did I tell you at Board of Trustees meeting I asked for a street light for an old lady at a dead end street and got it, and two more were volunteered for other places too.  I am getting Harbin opened for the Lynchs.  I end up with the zoning map because I volunteered to color it.  More fun!  I wish I could run for Trustee.

Confidentially!  Little Valley will probably go to Wittle (sale) for a very exclusive country club.  Curtis Wright is trying to buy large acreage there also (nearby) to get more watershed protection.

I love you so dearly.  Sweet dreams, beloved.  Lloydine

________________________________________________________________________
Notes of explanation or clarification:

2010.04.26

Carson City, Nevada: September 30, 1958

September 30th, 1958

________________________________________________________________________

AIR LETTER – AEROGRAMME
VIA AIR MAIL – PAR AVION
Pre-stamped U.S. Postage 10c Air Mail letter and envelope.

Addressed to:
Mr. Fred W. Clayton
American Embassy – USOM Kabul
Department of State Mail Room
Washington 25, D.C.

USA Air letter - front and back of “envelope” - circa 1958

Typed letter #2:

Senders name and address:
Lloydine Clayton
405 N. Roop St.
Carson City, Nevada
U.S.A.
________________________________________________________________________

September 30, 1958

My Darling Fred,

Your letters have been most interesting – last received was from Hong Kong.  We appreciate the time you have taken to write them.  You did not mention the big typhoon which hit Tokyo just after you left.  We are glad you saw the town before the damage was done.

We’ll be looking for the pictures.

I have continued to work on clearing the yard to the limit of my strength.  The whole side yard is cleared and a temporary fence relocated. (probably quite permanent) and the north yard is also cleared.  I have not yet done the clothesline yard nor the two rear yards.  Maybe I’ll have space for a sketch of some changes.  I’m a little bit behind schedule because of troubles getting things rototilled, but it is now half done.

Some of the packing troubles are beginning to show up.  I had particularly left you the slim scissors and given myself the heavy yard one so I could cut down lilies etc.  It seems I have the slim one (a duplicate of one I have here) and I can’t find the heavy yard one at all.  What are you going to do without the slim scissors I had left for the Afghanistan shipment?  Also I had put 100 informals in the home box and now I can’t find any.  I wanted them to write Burris and Melarkey and others.  200 went to Afghanistan in another box.  All I asked you to do about scissors was add one sewing one to the home shipment, and this was done nicely.

Weather here has been exquisitely just right.  There are signs that this could be a very golden fall.  Donald was looking at a very bright big dipper this evening.  Days are so delightful I wish they would never change.

Kenneth came out as one of two in Carson High on the Scholarship Qualifying Test for Merit.  Now he takes college board and fills out papers and if he keeps up his average, he is in.  Keezer and he had identical final scores, in the 99th percentile.  10,000 semi-finalists represent ½ of 1% of the high school seniors.

I haven’t done anything in the yard yet that I regret.

(Yard diagram showing changes in planting and layout)

Washington bank balances came today and saved my life.  I love you so very much and look forward to your letters with such interest

Sweet Dreams and Happy Wishes.
Lloydine, Don & Ken

2010.02.28

Amritsar, India: September 30, 1958

September 30th, 1958

_______________________________________________________________________

Air tissue writing paper:

Addressed to:
Lloydine Clayton
405 N. Roop St.
Carson City, Nevada

Senders name and address:
FRED W. CLAYTON
________________________________________________________________________

Amritsar, India
Tuesday, 30 Sept. ‘58

My Darlings,

Today I’m still in Amritsar!  The experience here is worthy of consideration for a play.

2010.03.01

Amritsar, India: September 28, 1958

September 28th, 1958

_______________________________________________________________________

Air tissue writing paper:

Addressed to:
Lloydine Clayton
405 N. Roop St.
Carson City, Nevada

Senders name and address:
FRED W. CLAYTON
________________________________________________________________________

Amritsar, IndiaSunday 28 Sept. ‘58

This letter was interrupted yesterday by lunch and now I just finished breakfast.

Yesterday afternoon I visited the Golden Temple of the Sikhs.  I suppose I took too many pictures.

Seven of us had dinner together here last night.  Three Germans, two Americans, one Italian and one Scotchman.  The dinner conversation was fascinating.

Must close now and get ready to go.  All my love,

Fred.

19:52

Amritsar, India: September 27, 1958

September 27th, 1958

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Air tissue writing paper:

Addressed to:
Lloydine Clayton
405 N. Roop St.
Carson City, Nevada

Senders name and address:
FRED W. CLAYTON
________________________________________________________________________

Amritsar, India
12:00 Noon – 27 Sept. ‘58

My Darlings,

Here I am at the holy place of the Sikhs about twenty miles from the Pakistan border and not too far from Kashmir.  The weather has closed in and the planes’ compass is broken so the flight is grounded until tomorrow.

Lahore is just over the border in Pakistan but since I have only a single trip visa I won’t be able to go there.

It is cool here but extremely humid.  The rains fall continuously.  However it is better here than in Delhi.  I understand that all the passengers will be housed in a guest house tonight.  Right now I think I could sleep for a week.

19:47.

New Delhi, India: September 27, 1958

September 27th, 1958

_______________________________________________________________________

Air tissue Hotel writing paper:

Hotel Imperial – New Delhi, India – An Oberoi Hotel
Cables & Telegrams “COMFORT” New Delhi – Telephone 47111 to 47119

Addressed to:
Lloydine Clayton
405 N. Roop St.
Carson City, Nevada

Senders name and address:
FRED W. CLAYTON
________________________________________________________________________

Amritsar, India27 Sept. ‘58

Dearest Lloydine, Ken and Don,

It is 5:15 A.M. and I am waiting for Breakfast.  At this time of the morning it is served in ones room only.

Last night “Mother India” almost had me down.  India is the acid test!  India is the France of the Orient!

Breakfast

The service was good.  A tea table wheeled into the room.  The coffee pot covered with a ‘tea cozy”.  The ants from the kitchen came along too so I had a bit of company.

The world is bright and cheerful this morning even though my reservation for Kabul has not been confirmed.

Last night while I was checking on the ticket problem the airport bus left with my suit case, my brief case, and coat but without me!  At the hotel only my suit case was unloaded.  I had to take a taxi to the hotel and then another to get my things.  Everyone was excited and helpful but anything but direct and forceful.  I was patient and now there is organization for the moment.

Off for Kabul.

Lots of love, Fred.

05:00.

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