The murder of Lee Harvey Oswald

November 24th, 1963

The murder of Lee Harvey Oswald

~ There really was NO other news story on this day.

Let’s go back.  Let’s revisit Sunday, November 24, 1963.

On Friday the President of the United States, John Fitzgerald Kennedy had been assassinated while in a motorcade weaving its way away from the canyonlands of downtown Dallas, Texas.  The resulting shock and dismay was partially relieved by reports that the only, or at least the primary, assassin in this murder of a President had been identified and caught within a remarkably short one and a half hours; the result of apparently fantastic luck and diligent, if not extraordinary, police work.

The suspect, a Mr. Lee Harvey Oswald, aged 24, was in police custody.  He was being held at the Dallas Police Department, one of several municipal (city) departments located in the historic Dallas Municipal Building, a Beaux Arts building built in 1914.  The most memorable event of November 24th would center on the Dallas Municipal Building Annex, built immediately adjacent to the beaux arts building in (or circa) 1954.

Of course one would not have known these things at the time, or even after reading the Warren Commission Report.   The focus in the news and in the report was on “the police headquarters” and “the jail” and later “the Police and Courts Building” and the names of the police men who had the suspected assassin in secure and safe custody until something suddenly happened to dispel the complacency of those that believed in law and order, good police work and justice, and that the “truth would out” (at least in the lifetimes of those that were witnesses to the history).

I was fourteen years of age at the time.  I lived in Nevada.  I was a sophomore in High School and made my “living” by selling newspapers every day after school.  I had more than a passing interest in both politics and the news.

I had never been to Dallas.  I was dependent on the descriptions, the diagrams and maps, the images that the media sent me in my effort to picture or to visualize what was happening in the world with Dallas as the lens.  The lens (that day) showed this:

Lee Harvey Oswald is shot.  For those watching television that morning in Nevada it was an opportunity to witness “the first live murder ever broadcast on television”.  I did not see it live.  Lee Harvey Oswald did not die in the basement garage of the Dallas Municipal Building Annex.  He died away from the lenses of the cameras, in Parkland Memorial Hospital where his second child had been born just 35 days earlier.

If one believes the Warren Commission Report it was by the most amazing of occurrences that Lee Harvey Oswald died.  Had Jack Ruby entered the basement garage just 30 seconds later he would have not been able to shoot Oswald.  Had the police lined up as instructed the attempt would have failed.  Had there been even two guards at the Main Street entrance to the garage Jack Ruby could never had gotten in.  Had the one guard, Officer Roy Eugene Vaughn, not been distracted by the police car driven by Lieutenant Rio S. Pierce Jack Ruby could not have slipped into the garage.

The events of the day, November 24, 1963, are centered on the (Dallas) Municipal Building and about six minutes of time in the (Dallas) Municipal Building Annex.  What is amazing is that neither the Warren Commission nor most of the press seemed to be versed in even the most basic of geography.  While the Municipal Building is clearly identified as such on three sides of the building the Warren Commission consistently uses alternate descriptions and names.  It would be like using “Press Secretary” instead of the term “White House” to refer to news regarding the Executive Branch in Washington D.C.

The problem gets worse when “left and right” are used instead of east or west or other cardinal directions.  Then there is the noteworthy Page 210 description of the murder site in the Warren Commission Report:

Warren Commission Report – Page 210 – 4th paragraph:
The spacious basement of the Police and Courts Building contains, among other things, the jail office and the police garage. (See Commission Exhibit No. 2179, p. 211.) The jail office, into which the jail elevator opens, is situated on the west side of an auto ramp cutting across the length of the basement from Main Street, on the north side of the building, to Commerce Street, on the south side. From the foot of this ramp, on the east side, midway through the basement, a decline runs down a short distance to the L-shaped police garage. In addition to the auto ramp, five doors to the garage provide access to the basement from the Police and Courts Building on the west side of the garage and the attached Municipal Building on the east. Three of these five doors provide access to three elevators opening into the garage, two for passengers near the central part of the garage and

Warren Commission Report – Page 212 – 1st paragraph:
one for service at the east end of the garage. A fourth door near the passenger elevator opens into the municipal building; the fifth door, at the Commerce Street side of the garage, opens into a subbasement that is connected with both buildings.

Today it is very simple to identify the fact that the term “Police and Courts Building” exists almost exclusively as an invention of the Warren Commission and/or of press men that were unfamiliar with Dallas and who were obviously not able to even read the writing on the outside of the buildings walls.

It is difficult even now to assess weather the vagueness and the incompetent inaccuracies in the Warren Commission Report were an effort to mislead and or confuse the trail of the actual tale regarding the death of Oswald, or whether the Commission members (and staff) were just  so overloaded with preported “facts” that there just wasn’t time to “fact check” the details that were presented.

The Warren Commission Report, it must be remembered, was a document created in lieu of a trial.   Had Lee Harvey Oswald not been murdered he would have been tried, publicly, and with a public record of argument and evidence.  There would have been no need for a Presidential Commission.  Even Jack Ruby, publicly, demonstrated that he acknowledged this fact when he stated that the reason for murdering Oswald was to, “save Mrs. Kennedy the ordeal of a trial”  (Warren Commission Report – Page 812 – Question 9).  A better question by the Commission would have been, “Did you shoot Oswald in order to save Mrs. Kennedy and others from the ordeal of a trial?”

The facts demonstrate that from the moment of the shooting (of Kennedy) that there were different perceptions of from where the shots came, how many shots and about who had done the firing.  The incredibly swift identification of Oswald created more questions about a possible (probably communist, or Castro or anti-Castro terrorist; according to various speculations) conspiracy.  When Oswald was caught, his earliest statements cut quickly to the issue.  He denied knowledge of the events to which he was charged, he raised the issue of why was he being interrogated without the presence of legal counsel and finally he made his most telling statement, “I am just a patsy.” (Video begins at 4:28 and ends at 5:00 minutes).


A timeline of Lee Harvey Oswald’s last day of life illustrates what is known about this Sunday in late November of 1963 in Dallas.  Links are included to maps, diagrams, pictures and video archives that clarify what was not clear to nearly anyone on that day.

Saturday, November 23, 1963 (1963.11.23):

PM
07:30
Sometime after 7:30 Saturday evening, according to Assistant Chief Batchelor, two reporters told him that they wanted to go out to dinner but that “they didn’t want to miss anything if we were going to move the prisoner.” Curry came upon them at that point and told the two newsmen that if they returned by 10 o’clock in the morning, they wouldn’t “miss anything.”

I (Curry) went out and told the newspaper people … “I believe if you are back here by 10 o’clock you will be back in time to observe anything you care to observe.”

Sunday, November 24, 1963 (1963.11.24):

AM
02:30 – 03:00

During the night, between 2:30 and 3 a.m., the local office of the FBI and the sheriff’s office received telephone calls from an unidentified man who warned that a committee had decided “to kill the man that killed the President.”

Shortly after, an FBI agent notified the Dallas police of the anonymous threat.

The police department and ultimately Chief Curry were informed of both threats.

08:30 – 08:45
Immediately after his arrival at the building on Sunday morning between 8:30 and 8:45 a.m., Curry spoke by telephone with Sheriff J. E. Decker about the transfer.  When Decker indicated that he would leave to Curry the decision on whether the sheriff’s office or the police would move Oswald, Curry decided that the police would handle (the transfer) it because “we had so much involved here, we were the ones that were investigating the case and we had the officers set up down stairs to handle it.

members of the press had already begun to gather in the basement.

After talking with Decker, Curry began to discuss plans for the transfer. With the threats against Oswald in mind, Curry suggested to Batchelor and Deputy Chief Stevenson that Oswald be transported to the county jail in an armored truck, to which they agreed. While Batchelor made arrangements to have an armored truck brought to the building, Curry and Stevenson tentatively agreed on the route the armored truck would follow from the building to the county jail.

Curry decided that Oswald would leave the building via the basement.  He stated later that he reached this decision shortly after his arrival at the police building Sunday morning, …  There is no evidence that anyone opposed this decision.

Capt. C. E. Talbert, who was in charge of the patrol division for the city of Dallas on the morning of November 24, retained a small number of policemen in the building when he took charge that morning and later ordered other patrolmen from several districts to report to the basement.

Two members (who?) of the Dallas police did suggest to Captain Fritz that Oswald be taken from the building by another exit, leaving the press “waiting in the basement and on Commerce Street, and we could be to the county jail before anyone knew what was taking place.”  However, Fritz said that he did not think Curry would agree to such a plan because he (Curry) had promised that Oswald would be transferred at a time when newsmen could take pictures.  Forrest Sorrels also suggested to Fritz that Oswald be moved at an unannounced time when no one was around, but Fritz again responded that Curry “wanted to go along with the press and not try to put anything over on them.”

09:00
At about 9 a.m. Deputy Chief Stevenson instructed all detectives within the building to remain for the transfer.

Kennedy Assassination Timeline

November 22nd, 1963

Kennedy Assassination Timeline

~ An abbreviated baseline timeline identifying key events connected with the assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, President of the United States.

Kennedy Assassination Timeline

February 22, 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald and his wife Marina Oswald (Marina Nikolayevna Prusakova Oswald) meet Ruth Paine (Ruth Avery Hyde Paine) at a party hosted by Everett Glover.  Ruth’s husband Michael Paine (Michael Ralph Paine) did not attend the party because of a cold.  See:  Warren Commission testimony – Michael R. Paine.

April 10, 1963
Warren Commission testimony – Michael R. Paine.
And she invited Marina and Lee to our house for dinner, and here the date that comes to mind is April 10. 

June 5, 1963
President John F. Kennedy, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, and Texas Governor John B. Connally, Jr. meet at the Cortez Hotel in El Paso, Texas and decide that there should be a Presidential trip to Texas.

July, 1963
Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, and John B. Connally, Jr., Governor of Texas plan (with President Kennedy) a five day trip to Texas beginning in San Antonio, continuing to Fort Worth and with the third stop being in Dallas.
Warren Commission Report – Page 1 – 2nd paragraph:
a Texas trip planned 5 months before by the President, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, and John B. Connally, Jr., Governor of Texas.

August 5, 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald contacts anti-Castro extremists in New Orleans and offers to join them.
Warren Commission Report – Page 728 – 4th paragraph:
On August 5, he visited a store managed by Carlos Bringuier, a Cuban refugee and avid opponent of Castro and the New Orleans delegate of the Cuban student directorate. Oswald indicated an interest in joining the struggle against Castro.  He told Bringuier that he had been a marine and was trained in guerrilla warfare, and that he was willing not only to train Cubans to fight Castro but also to join the fight himself. 

August 6, 1963
The next day Oswald returned to the store and left his “Guidebook for Marines” for Bringuier.

August 9, 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald d
Warren Commission Report – Page 728 – 4th paragraph:
On August 9, Bringuier saw Oswald passing out Fair Play for Cuba leaflets.  Bringuier and his companions became angry and a dispute resulted. Oswald and the three Cuban exiles were arrested for disturbing the peace. 

August 10, 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald requests that the FBI interviews him in regard to his Fair Play for Cuba activities.  His request is granted and he is interviewed by FBI
Agent John Quigley who spends over an hour interviewing Oswald before Oswald is released from jail.
Oswald spent the night in jail and was interviewed the next day by a lieutenant of the New Orleans Police Department.  At Oswald’s request, an FBI agent also interviewed him.

October 14, 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald rents a room at 1026 North Beckley in the Oak Cliff neighborhood of Dallas, Texas.  The address is for a rooming house.  Mrs. Earlene Roberts, the housekeeper, rents Oswald the room between 1 and 2 o’clock.

October 16, 1963
Lee Harvey Oswald begins temporary employment as a roustabout (a schoolbook order picker) at the Texas School Book Depository building.

October 24, 1963
Adlai Stevenson, United States Ambassador to the United Nations visited Dallas for a U.N. Day (United Nations Day) speech in Dallas’ Memorial Auditorium Theater. “When one crude superpatriot interrupted to shout a question about Stevenson’s beliefs, Adlai, unruffled, replied: “I believe in the forgiveness of sin and the redemption of ignorance.” When he left the auditorium, a jeering flock of pickets swarmed around him. Many lugged anti-U.N. and anti-Adlai signs.”  Time Magazine  Also here.

November 21 1963 (Thursday)

10:00 a.m.
After leaving the White House on Thursday morning, the President had flown initially to San Antonio where Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson joined the party and the President dedicated new research facilities at the U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine.  Following a testimonial dinner in Houston for U.S. Representative Albert Thomas, the President flew to Fort Worth where he spent the night

November 22, 1963 (Friday)

10:00 a.m.
and spoke at a large breakfast gathering on Friday.
Kennedy begins the day in Fort Worth, Texas.

11:10 a.m.
Kennedy leaves Carswell AFB onboard Air Force One to fly to Love Field (DFW) in Dallas, Texas.  The air distance is about 35 miles.  The flight takes about none (9) minutes.

11:37 a.m.
Air Force One arrives (touches down) at Love Field (DFW) in Dallas, Texas.

11:40 a.m.
Warren Commission Report – Page 1 – 2nd paragraph:
At 11:40 a.m.., c.s.t., on Friday, November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy, and their party arrived at Love Field, Dallas, Tex.

The eight cars comprising the motorcade are lined up and waiting on the tarmac at Love Field.

Dallas Deputy Police Chief (of Services) George L. Lumpkin drove the pilot car.  In the pilot car was Jacob L. “Jack” Puterbaugh and Lieutenant Colonel George Whitmeyer.  The pilot car was the first car in the motorcade, usually traveling about 1/4 mile (1,300 feet) (1.5 minutes at 10 mph) ahead of the main motorcade.  The Warren Commission fails to interview any of those in the pilot car.

The lead car is an unmarked four-door white 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 (police interceptor) driven by Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry.  The Presidential limousine, a 1961 Lincoln Continental convertible is the second vehicle.  The third car is the Presidential follow-up car, Secret Service car #1, a 1956 Cadillac limousine convertible carrying ten (10) aides and agents (including those on the running boards) code-named the Queen Mary.  The Vice Presidential limousine, another 1961 Lincoln Continental convertible,  is the fourth vehicle.  Vice Presidential follow-up car   Press pool car, (on loan from the telephone company)  Press Car:

The motorcade was originally scheduled to leave Love Field at 11:30 a.m.  It was anticipated that it would take between 38 and 45 minutes to reach the Dallas World Trade Mart, arriving at the Trade Mart about 12:15 at the latest.  This itinerary would put the leading cars of the motorcade at Dealey Plaza somewhere between 12:03 and 12:10, or at Dealey Plaza for a “High Noon” rendezvous.

11:50 a.m.
The presidential motorcade leaves Love Field.
The motorcade left Love Field shortly after 11:50 a.m., and proceeded through residential neighborhoods, stopping twice at the President’s request to greet well-wishers among the friendly crowds. Each time the President’s car halted, Secret Service agents from the “follow-up” car moved forward to assume a protective stance near the President and Mrs. Kennedy.

The 11 mile route of the Kennedy motorcade through Dallas was: left turn from the south end of Love Field to West Mockingbird Lane, right on Lemmon Avenue, right at the “Y” on Turtle Creek Boulevard, straight on Cedar Springs Road, left on North Harwood Street, right on Main Street, right on Houston Street, sharp left on Elm Street, through Triple Underpass, right turn up ramp to North Stemmons Freeway, to Dallas Trade Mart at 2100 North Stemmons.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
The motorcade follows a route through Dallas, during which the president stops the car several times to talk to citizens who approach his limousine.

12:28 p.m.
Dallas police radio channel 1, #56 Patrolman W.P. Parker, “traffic on a 1956 Chevrolet.  I can’t see the license number.”  Dallas police radio channel 2, #5 Deputy Chief of Police George L. Lumpkin, “Notify Captain Souter of the location of the convoy now.”  Dispatcher:  15/2, now on Main, probably just past Lamar.  #1 Dallas Police Chief Curry, “Just crossing Market Street.”

12:30 p.m.
President Kennedy is shot and taken to Parkland Hospital in Dallas.

1:00 a.m.
President Kennedy is pronounced dead at Parkland Hospital.

1:07 p.m.
Lee Harvey Oswald is seen “slipping in” without paying to the Texas Theatre in the Oak Cliff neighborhood of Dallas.

1:08 p.m.
Officer J.D. Tippit contacts the Dallas Police Department dispatch unit by radio from his squad car, Dallas Police radio car #10.  He is patrolling the Oak Cliff neighborhood in Dallas.

1:17 p.m.
Officer J.D. Tippit dies instantly (next to his squad car) in the Oak Cliff neighborhood in Dallas after being shot with two bullets, either three or four bullets were fired.

1:22 p.m.
A rifle is found on the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository, a building near Dealey Plaza in Dallas, Texas.

1:45 p.m.
15 policemen of the Dallas Police Department and an FBI agent descend on the Texas Theatre.  The identification, apprehension and arrest of Oswald involved a tumultuous five (5) minute confrontation

1:49 p.m.
Lee Harvey Oswald is removed from the Texas Theatre in the Oak Cliff neighborhood of Dallas as a suspect in the murder of Dallas Police Officer Tippit.

1:50 p.m.
A Dallas police car leaves the Texas Theatre with Lee Harvey Oswald enroute to the Municipal Building.  Detective Bob K. Carroll, Sergeant Jerry Hill, P. L. Bentley, C.T. Walker and Patrolman K. E. Lyon (Vice section).

1:58 p.m.
Oswald arrives (in Dallas Police Car 2) at the (Dallas) Municipal Building jail elevator (basement entrance).

2:04 p.m.
John F. Kennedy’s body leaves Parkland Hospital enroute to Love Field.

2:?? p.m.
John F. Kennedy’s body, accompanied by Jaceline Kennedy, arrives at Love Field and is loaded onto Air Force One.

2:20 p.m.
Lee Harvey Oswald is interrogated in the Municipal Building for more than an hour and a half.
Warren Commission Report – Page 198 – 2nd paragraph:
After about 15 or 20 minutes Oswald was ushered into the office of Captain Fritz for the first of several interrogation sessions. 

4:05 p.m.
At 4:05 p.m. he was taken to the basement assembly room for his first lineup.  While waiting outside the lineup room, Oswald was searched, and five cartridges and other items were removed from his pockets. 

4:20 p.m.
After the lineup, at about 4:20, Oswald was returned to Captain Fritz’ office for further questioning. 

6:20 p.m.
Two hours later, at 6:20 p.m., Oswald was taken downstairs for a second lineup

6:35 p.m.
and returned to Captain Fritz’ office within 15 minutes for additional interrogation. 

7:02 p.m.
Shortly after 7 p.m., Captain Fritz signed a complaint charging Oswald with the murder of Patrolman Tippit

7:10 p.m.
Oswald was formally arraigned, i.e., advised of the charges, at 7:10 p.m., before Justice of the Peace David L. Johnston, who came to Captain Fritz’ office for the occasion.

7:30 p.m.
The Warren Commission Report does NOT record the time of the THIRD TRIP from Captain Fritz’ Office to the elevator, however it was probably about 7:30 p.m.

7:40 p.m.
After a third lineup at about 7:40 p.m., Oswald was returned to Fritz’ office. 

8:40 p.m.
About an hour later, after further questioning, Oswald’s fingerprints and palmprints were taken and a paraffin test administered in Fritz’ office, after which the questioning resumed. 

11:26 p.m.
Captain Fritz signs a complaint charging Lee Harvey Oswald with the murder of President Kennedy.  At 11:26 p.m. Fritz signed the complaint charging Oswald with the murder of President Kennedy. 

Shortly after midnight, detectives took Oswald to the basement assembly room for an appearance of several minutes before members of the press.

November 23, 1963 (Saturday)

1:30 a.m.
on November 23d following the assassination, Joe R. Molina of 4306 Brown street in Dallas was “paid a visit by the local police department at 1:30 in the morning”.

10:30 a.m.
Lee Harvey Oswald is interrogated for a fourth time, this session lasts for two hours and forty minutes.

11:40 a.m.

1:10 p.m.
During the day, Oswald speaks with family and friends.

5:30 p.m.
Oswald talks in person, in the Municipal Building, to H. Louis Nichols, President of the Dallas Bar Association, for five minutes.

November 24, 1963 (Sunday)

9:30 a.m.
Lee Harvey Oswald is interrogated for a fifth time.

11:21 a.m.
Jack Ruby shoots Oswald in the basement of the Municipal Building Annex during a transfer from the Dallas Police Department to the Dallas County Sheriif.

Jack Ruby dies in prison on March 1, 1967.

November 22, 1963 (Friday)

Dallas and the Motorcade

November 22nd, 1963

This post is under construction.

Dallas and the Motorcade

~ The day began with a few comments in Fort Worth and then events moved to Dallas.

November 21, 1963 (Thursday)

Warren Commission Report – Page 42 – 3rd paragraph:
Late in the evening, the Presidential party flew to Fort Worth where they spent the night at the Texas Hotel.

November 22, 1963 (Friday)

Fort Worth, Texas

Warren Commission Report – Page 42 – 4th paragraph:
On the morning of November 22, President Kennedy attended a breakfast at the hotel and afterward addressed a crowd at an open parking lot.  The President liked outdoor appearances because more people could see and hear him.  Before leaving the hotel, the President, Mrs. Kennedy, and Kenneth O’Donnell talked about the risks inherent in Presidential public appearances.  According to O’Donnell, the President commented that “if anybody really wanted to shoot the President of the United States, it was not a very difficult job–all one had to do was get a high building someday with a telescopic rifle, and there was nothing anybody could do to defend against such an attempt.” Upon concluding the conversation, the President prepared to depart for Dallas.

8:45 a.m.
President Kennedy appears before a large crowd of two thousand on-lookers gathered in the Hotel Texas parking lot.  Governor Connally of Texas is there and Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) briefly introduces the President as “our fearless leader”.  Kennedy gives a planned and uninspired speech of 6 minutes and then works the crowd before returning into the Hotel Texas.  A light rain is falling.

9:00 a.m.
President Kennedy speaks at a large breakfast gathering in the hotel grand ballroom of the Texas Hotel in Fort Worth, Texas on Friday November 22, 1963.  The breakfast event that began at 8:00 a.m. is sponsored by the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce.
9:22 a.m.
The President beckons Agent Duncan to the head table and asks him to  ask Mrs. Kennedy to come down to the ballroom and to ask the orchestra to play “The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You” when she enters.  Agent Clint Hill advises Mrs. Kennedy that JFK expects her downstairs in the Ballroom.

9:25 a.m.
Jackie Kennedy appears at the breakfast wearing a pink suit and pill box hat.  She is warmly received.  The orchestra plays “The Eyes of Texas are upon you”.

The Eyes of Texas are upon you,
All the live long day.
The Eyes of Texas are upon you,
You can not get away.
Do not think you can escape them
At night or early in the morn-
The Eyes of Texas are upon you
‘Till Gabriel blows his horn. 

9:55 a.m.
At the Texas Hotel in Fort Worth, JFK and Jackie have returned to Suite 850.  JFK informs Kenny O’Donnell that the Presidential party will leave at 10:40 a.m.  Jackie asks, “We have a whole hour?”  JFK asks her if she is enjoying the trip. “Oh, Jack,” she replies “campaigning is so easy when you’re President.”

After President Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy return to their suite shortly after 10 a.m. President Kennedy telephones former Vice President John Nance Garner at his home in Ulvade, Texas, to wish him a happy 95th birthday.  The Kennedys spent time looking at the art exhibit that had been mounted in their suite especially for their visit including a Van Gogh, a Monet, and a Picasso.

Aides point out an advertisement in the day’s Dallas Morning News accusing the President of disloyalty to the country through “softness on communism”.  At this point  Kennedy muses out loud about how easy it would be to assassinate a traveling President (See: William Manchester “Death of a President” (1967, p. 121).  Before the Kennedys depart for the motorcade, the President reiterates (on the telephone) to aide Lawrence F. O’Brien the importance of getting Senator Yarborough to ride in the same car with Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, the V.P. that had been introduced at 8:45 a.m. (two hours before) as, “the greatest Texan that ever lived.”

10:02 a.m.
John F. Kennedy confers with Governor John Connally.

10:40 a.m.
The Kennedys and Governor Connally enter a white convertible waiting in front of the Texas Hotel, a car borrowed by the Secret Service from professional golfer Ben Hogan.  There are waves and cheers from the onlookers.  The motorcade leaves for Carswell Air Force Base.

11:17 a.m.
Kennedy departs from Carswell AFB onboard Air Force One to fly to Love Field (DFW) in Dallas, Texas.  The air distance is about 35 miles.  The flight takes 13 minutes
about none (9) minutes.

Dallas, Texas

11:39 a.m.
Air Force One arrives (touches down) at Love Field (DFW) in Dallas, Texas.

11:40 a.m.
Warren Commission Report – Page 1 – 2nd paragraph:
At 11:40 a.m.., c.s.t., on Friday, November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy, Mrs. Kennedy, and their party arrived at Love Field, Dallas, Tex.

The eight cars comprising the motorcade are lined up and waiting on the tarmac at Love Field.

Dallas Deputy Police Chief (of Services) George L. Lumpkin is the driver of the pilot car.  In the pilot car is Jacob L. “Jack” Puterbaugh and Lieutenant Colonel George Whitmeyer.  The pilot car is the first car in the motorcade, usually traveling about 1/4 mile (1,300 feet) (1.5 minutes at 10 mph) ahead of the main motorcade.  The Warren Commission fails to interview any of those in the pilot car.

The lead car is an unmarked four-door white 1963 Ford Galaxie 500 (police interceptor) driven by Dallas Police Chief Jesse Curry.  The Presidential limousine, a 1961 Lincoln Continental convertible is the second vehicle.  The third car is the Presidential follow-up car, Secret Service car #1, a 1956 Cadillac limousine convertible carrying ten (10) aides and agents (including those on the running boards) code-named the Queen Mary.  The Vice Presidential limousine, a 1964 Lincoln Continental convertible,  is the fourth vehicle.  Vice Presidential follow-up car   Press pool car, (on loan from the telephone company)  Press Car:

The motorcade was originally scheduled to leave Love Field at 11:30 a.m.  It was anticipated that it would take between 38 and 45 minutes to reach the Dallas World Trade Mart, arriving at the Trade Mart about 12:15 at the latest.  This itinerary would put the leading cars of the motorcade at Dealey Plaza somewhere between 12:03 and 12:10, or at Dealey Plaza for a “High Noon” rendezvous.

11:50 a.m.
The presidential motorcade leaves Love Field.
The motorcade left Love Field shortly after 11:50 a.m., and proceeded through residential neighborhoods, stopping twice at the President’s request to greet well-wishers among the friendly crowds. Each time the President’s car halted, Secret Service agents from the “follow-up” car moved forward to assume a protective stance near the President and Mrs. Kennedy.

The 11 mile route of the Kennedy motorcade through Dallas was: left turn from the south end of Love Field to West Mockingbird Lane, right on Lemmon Avenue, right at the “Y” on Turtle Creek Boulevard, straight on Cedar Springs Road, left on North Harwood Street, right on Main Street, right on Houston Street, sharp left on Elm Street, through Triple Underpass, right turn up ramp to North Stemmons Freeway, to Dallas Trade Mart at 2100 North Stemmons.

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
The motorcade follows a route through Dallas, during which the president stops the car several times to talk to citizens who approach his limousine.

12:28 p.m.
Dallas police radio channel 1, #56 Patrolman W.P. Parker, “traffic on a 1956 Chevrolet.  I can’t see the license number.”  Dallas police radio channel 2, #5 Deputy Chief of Police George L. Lumpkin, “Notify Captain Souter of the location of the convoy now.”  Dispatcher:  15/2, now on Main, probably just past Lamar.  #1 Dallas Police Chief Curry, “Just crossing Market Street.”

12:30 p.m.
President Kennedy is shot and taken to Parkland Hospital in Dallas.

1:00 a.m.
President Kennedy is pronounced dead at Parkland Hospital.

2012.03.11 – 07:50.

“I am just a patsy”, Lee Harvey Oswald

November 22nd, 1963

“I am just a patsy”, Lee Harvey Oswald

~ On the trail of when and where this statement was made and where in the Warren Commission Report it can be found, if it was included in the report.

The most famous Lee Harvey Oswald line was, “I am just a patsy.”  This is the last sentence in Oswald’s first meeting with the press.  The interview occurs on the Third Floor of the (Dallas) Municipal Building (aka: “Dallas Police Headquarters“) while Lee Harvey Oswald is being moved through a “hallway” that is filled with various reporters from the news media.

The footage was apparently shot by NBC News.  The original footage was “Reel 3” of a 16mm black and white film product.  There is no indication of the time of day that this footage was filmed.

OSWALD IN CUSTODY (REELS 3 & 4 OF 13)
R3: CU TOP OF ENTRANCE POLICE & COURTS BUILDING. OSWALD WITH POLICE COMES OUT OF ROOM. RPTRS ASK QUESTIONS AS HE WALKS. OSWALD SAYS HE NEEDS LEGAL REPRESENTATION BUT THE POLICE OFFICERS WONT LET ME HAVE ANY. I DONT KNOW WHAT THIS IS ALL ABOUT. I WORK IN THAT BUILDING. NATURALLY I WAS IN THE BUILDING SINCE I WORK THERE. IM JUST A PATSY.

“I am just a patsy.” Video begins at 4:24 and ends at 5:00 minutes).

Oswald:
I’d like some legal representation but these police officers have not allowed me to, to have any. I, uh, I don’t know what this is all about.
Reporter (off camera):
Did you kill the president?
Oswald:
No, sir, I didn’t. People keep asking me that. Sir?
Reporter (off camera):
Did you shoot the president?
Oswald:
I work in that building.
Reporter (off camera):
Were you in that building at the time?
Oswald:
Naturally, if I work in that building, yes, sir.
Reporter (off camera):
Back up man (or ma’am).
Reporter (off camera):
Did you shoot the president?
Oswald:
No, they’ve taken me in because of the fact that I lived in the Soviet Union.  I’m just a patsy.

It is unclear whether the Warren Commission Report even contains this critical statement by Oswald.  The report does describe the third floor of the (Dallas) Municipal Building where the Dallas Police Department had various offices and the various Bureaus of the Dallas Police Department were physically located:

Warren Commission Report – Page 196 – 3rd paragraph:
The focal center of the Police and Courts Building during Oswald’s detention was the third floor, which housed the main offices of the Dallas Police Department. The public elevators on this floor opened into a lobby midpoint of a corridor that extended along the length of the floor for about 140 feet. At one end of this 7-foot-wide corridor were the offices occupied by Chief of Police Jesse E. Curry and his immediate subordinates; at the other end was a small pressroom that could accommodate only a handful of reporters. Along this corridor were other police offices, including those of the major detective bureaus. Between the pressroom and the lobby was the complex of offices

Warren Commission Report – Page 198 – 1st paragraph:
belonging to the homicide and robbery bureau, headed by Capt. J. Will Fritz.

Diagram (floor plan) of the Third Floor of the (Dallas) Municipal Building – Dallas, Texas

Note:  The top of the diagram is the WEST side of the building.  The Press Room is at the NORTH end of the building.  The “Jail Elevator” is immediately next to the office of Captain Fritz and the Homicide Bureau offices on the central EAST side of the building.  The Jail Elevator connects the basement entry-egress point with both the jail cells and the Homicide Bureau Office.

The third floor diagram, the Warren Commission descriptions, and common sense clearly demonstrate that when Oswald was moved on the third floor it was between the two points of the Jail Elevator that opened onto the Third Floor Lobby and the door to the Homicide / Robbery Bureau Offices, a total distance of about 30 feet.

The footage for the “I am just a patsy” film clip was shot with the camera looking EAST as Lee Harvey Oswald was being moved from the Third Floor (Police Department) Lobby (the Jail Elevator) to the Homicide / Robbery Bureau OfficesThis means the film footage was taken at one of four times, as described in the Warren Commission Report.

Warren Commission Report – Page 198 – 2nd paragraph:
The policemen who seized Oswald at the Texas Theatre arrived with him at the police department building at about 2 p.m. and brought him immediately to the third floor offices of the homicide and robbery bureau to await the arrival of Captain Fritz from the Texas School Book Depository.  After about 15 or 20 minutes Oswald was ushered into the office of Captain Fritz for the first of several interrogation sessions.  At 4:05 p.m. he was taken to the basement assembly room for his first lineup.  While waiting outside the lineup room, Oswald was searched, and five cartridges and other items were removed from his pockets.  After the lineup, at about 4 :20, Oswald was returned to Captain Fritz’ office for further questioning.  Two hours later, at 6:20 p.m., Oswald was taken downstairs for a second lineup and returned to Captain Fritz’ office within 15 minutes (6:35 p.m.) for additional interrogation.  Shortly after 7 p.m., Captain Fritz signed a complaint charging Oswald with the murder of Patrolman Tippit.  Oswald was formally arraigned, i.e., advised of the charges, at 7:10 p.m., before Justice of the Peace David L. Johnston, who came to Captain Fritz’ office for the occasion.

The Warren Commission Report does NOT record the time of the THIRD TRIP from Captain Fritz’ Office to the elevator, however it was probably about 7:30 p.m.

After a third lineup at about 7:40 p.m., Oswald was returned to Fritz’ office.  About an hour later, after further questioning, Oswald’s fingerprints and palmprints were taken and a paraffin test administered in Fritz’ office, after which the questioning resumed.  At 11:26 p.m. Fritz signed the complaint charging Oswald with the murder of President Kennedy.  Shortly after midnight, detectives took Oswald to the basement assembly room for an appearance of several minutes before members of the press.

So, WE still do not know during which of the four press encounters it was that the “patsy” statement was made; but, we have noticed something else:

It is notable by this rather precise and detailed description of time and events that at no time in the 10 hours in police custody on November 22, 1963 was Lee Harvey Oswald given an opportunity to eat.  According to the descriptions provided in the Warren Commission Report Lee Harvey Oswald had not eaten since approximately 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 21st, 24 hours earlier.  It would be very difficult to believe that if Lee Harvey Oswald had NOT eaten for this period of time that he would not have added that grievance to his statements to reporters.

If he HAD eaten lunch at the time (12:15 p.m.) that he had stated, then the issue of food would not have been so pressing.  So what did Lee Harvey Oswald eat?  The answer is made clear by the testimony of his wife:

1.  217 O — 64 — vol. I —5 & 6

Mr. RANKIN. Do you know what his ordinary lunch was?
Mrs. OSWALD. Peanut butter sandwich, cheese sandwich, some lettuce, and he would buy himself a hamburger, something else, a coke.
Mr. RANKIN. And what about his evening meal?  Do you know what he ate in the evening meal?
Mrs. OSWALD. Usually meat, vegetables, fruit, dessert.
Mr. RANKIN. Where would he have that?

Mrs. OSWALD. He loved bananas. They were inexpensive.
The place where he rented a room, he could not cook there.  He said that there was some sort of a care across the street and that he ate there.
Mr. RANKIN. Did he ever tell you what he paid for his evening meal?
Mrs. OSWALD.  About a dollar, $1.30.
Mr. RANKIN. What about his breakfast? Do you know what he had for breakfast ordinarily?
Mrs. OSWALD. He never had breakfast. He just drank coffee and that is all.

So were there signs of “a hamburger” in the stomach or intestines of Lee Harvey Oswald when his autopsy was performed just a little over 48 hours after the question about “where he ate lunch” and “if he ate lunch”.  No, the autopsy failed to look into that.  The experts were more interested in obtaining slices of his brain.

There are three “down the hall” tapes.  The THIRD TAPE was filmed on Saturday, November 23, 1963 The ” tape refers to “bringing Oswald down the hallway again”.  “I don’t know what dispatches you people have been given, but I emphatically deny these charges”.

Video of first transfer to Homicide Bureau Office 3:50 – 4:10

The SECOND TAPE, “I didn’t shoot anybody”.

Video from INSIDE the BASEMENT Jail Elevator area starts at 2:28 and continues through 3:22 – 1 minute from arrival of elevator to first horn honk signaling the opening of the garage area hallway door.

Video of the ambulance arriving and leaving.

LHO Dallas Municipal Building Timeline

November 22nd, 1963

LHO Dallas Municipal Building Timeline

~ An illustrated and linked timeline relevant to Lee Harvey Oswald from the time of his arrival at the Municipal Building until the time of his departure.

Background:
Lee Harvey Oswald (“LHO”) was apprehended, arrested and taken into custody at the Texas Theatre in the Oak Cliff neighborhood of Dallas, Texas in conjunction with the 1:17 p.m. shooting of Officer Tippit, a police motor patrolman employed by the Dallas Police Department.   The identification, apprehension and arrest of Oswald involved a tumultuous five (5) minute confrontation that began at 1:45 p.m. inside the theater and ended at 1:50 p.m. when a Dallas police car left the Texas Theatre with Lee Harvey Oswald enroute to the Municipal Building.  (See: LHO Texas Theatre Timeline construction pending)

It is less than 3.5 miles from the Texas Theatre to the (Dallas) Municipal Building at Main Street and Harwood Street in downtown Dallas.  The presumed police car route would be north on Jefferson Boulevard to Market Street with a right turn (east) onto Main.  (Route Map is here.)

LHO Dallas Municipal Building Timeline

November 22, 1963 (Friday)

1:58 p.m.
Oswald arrived (in Dallas Police Car 2) at the (Dallas) Municipal Building jail elevator (basement entrance) about eight (8) minutes later, at 1:58 p.m.

Rationale for the 8 minute time of the 3.5 mile trip:
Warren Commission ReportPage 649 – 10th paragraph:
The distance from the Greyhound bus terminal at Jackson and Lamar Streets to the 500 block (south of Davis Street) of North Beckley

Warren Commission ReportPage 650 – 1st paragraph:
is 2.5 miles. Oswald actually got out in the 700 block (north of Neely Street) of North Beckley. The distance was, therefore, less than 2.5 miles.  Whaley has testified to the Commission that the trip took 6 minutes. Test runs made by members of the Commission staff under traffic conditions somewhat similar to those that existed on November 22, took approximately 5 minutes and 30 seconds.

Newspaper people and “local” media already at the Municipal Building:
Warren Commission Report – Page 206 – 4th paragraph:
When the police car bringing Oswald from the Texas Theatre drove into the basement of police headquarters at about 2 p.m. on Friday, some reporters and cameramen, principally from local papers and stations, were already on hand. The policemen formed a wedge around Oswald and conducted him to the elevator, but several newsmen crowded into the elevator with Oswald and the police.

The (Dallas) Municipal Building:
The Municipal Building in Dallas is an outwardly beautiful and historic Beaux Arts building completed (built) in 1914 at 106 South Harwood Street between Main Street on the north and Commerce Street on the south.  The building faces west, where it fronts Harwood Street.

The (Dallas) Municipal Building in 1930 engraving and 1913 architectural rendering:

 

The (Dallas) Municipal Building Annex:
In 1954 a building annex was added directly to the east of the original building.  The Municipal Building Annex, as it is properly called, was completed in 1956.  The architecture of the two buildings could not be more different.

The (Dallas) Police and Courts Building:
Even though the buildings are physically, functionally and historically very different the Warren Commission Report chose to conflate the two buildings as being one and to rename the clearly named Municipal Building and the Municipal Building Annex as the “Police and Courts Building“, as the police department building or as police headquartersIt was not unlike using “The Texas Department of Education building” instead of the term “Texas School Book Depository” to refer to the structure at the northwest corner of Houston and Elm Streets in Dallas.

The (Dallas) Municipal Building jail elevator and basement ramp interface:
The buildings are joined (connected) in the basement area where the jail elevator (in the Municipal Building) connects to a “jail office” and then a short brick-lined hallway that opens to a “receiving ramp” and the “police garage” (even further to the east), both of which are a part of the 1950’s Municipal Building Annex addition.

The relationship between these two buildings at the point of the basement interface is best illustrated by this diagram created in 1964 by the FBI:

Diagram of the (Dallas) Municipal Building jail office and jail elevator and the (Dallas) Municipal Building Annex entry / egress ramp:
In this partial view of the Municipal Building and Municipal Building Annex basements the north-south (Municipal Building) Ramp (receiving ramp) is featured.  The ramp is a one-way ramp, the entrance to which is from Main Street and the exit requiring a left turn onto Commerce Street.  At the top of the diagram (west) the jail elevator is shown, as well as the Jail Office and the brick-lined hallway connecting to the ramp to the west.  Across from the hallway, to the south and west is the beginning of the downward slope to the police garage (police parking).

In the illustration the armored car and the police cars are shown in the positions they were in at the time when Lee Harvey Oswald was shot by Jack Ruby.  Otherwise, this illustration accurately depicts the same area as it was at the time when Lee Harvey Oswald was brought to the Municipal Building by Dallas Police Car 2 at 1:58 p.m. on the afternoon of November 22, 1963.
Diagram (floor plan) of the Third Floor of the (Dallas) Municipal Building – Dallas, Texas:

The top of the diagram is the WEST side of the building.  The Press Room is at the NORTH end of the building.  The offices of Chief Curry and the Assistant Chiefs of the Dallas Police Department are at the SOUTH end of the building.

Warren Commission Report – Page 196 – 3rd paragraph:
The focal center of the Police and Courts Building during Oswald’s detention was the third floor, which housed the main offices of the Dallas Police Department. The public elevators on this floor opened into a lobby midpoint of a corridor that extended along the length of the floor for about 140 feet. At one end of this 7-foot-wide corridor were the offices occupied by Chief of Police Jesse E. Curry and his immediate subordinates; at the other end was a small pressroom that could accommodate only a handful of reporters. Along this corridor were other police offices, including those of the major detective bureaus. Between the pressroom and the lobby was the complex of offices
Warren Commission Report – Page 198 – 1st paragraph:
belonging to the homicide and robbery bureau, headed by Capt. J. Will Fritz.

Diagram of the Third Floor area of the (Dallas) Municipal Building where Lee Harvey Oswald was held, interrogated and transferred:

The “Jail Elevator” is immediately next to the office of Captain Fritz and the Homicide Bureau offices on the central EAST side of the building.  The Jail Elevator connects the basement entry-egress point with both the jail cells (on other floors) and the Third Floor Homicide and Robbery Bureau Office area.

2:00 p.m.
According to the clock in the Homicide – Robbery Bureau Offices he arrived (upstairs, on the third floor) in the Homicide – Robbery Bureau Offices at 2:00 p.m.

Warren Commission Report – Page 206 – 4th paragraph:
When the elevator stopped at the third floor, the cameramen ran ahead down the corridor, and then turned around and backed up, taking pictures of Oswald as he was escorted toward the homicide and robbery bureau office. According to one escorting officer, some six or seven reporters followed the police into the bureau office.

Warren Commission Report – Page 198 – 2nd paragraph:
The policemen who seized Oswald at the Texas Theatre arrived with him at the police department building at about 2 p.m. and brought him immediately to the third floor offices of the homicide and robbery bureau to await the arrival of Captain Fritz from the Texas School Book Depository.

Video of Lee Harvey Oswald in the Dallas Municipal Building:
Video
of announcement re: arrest of Oswald in the Texas Theatre.  This video begins with footage of the entrance to the Homicide and Robbery Offices, then shows Lee Harvey Oswald being brought from the Elevator Lobby.  The arrest announcement footage appears next, followed by footage showing the “rifle on display”.  This is the weapon retrieved from the Texas School Book Depository that Captain Fritz brought back with him about 2:15 p.m. after his one and a quarter hour (1.25 hour) sojourn at the Elm and Houston location.

Warren Commission ReportCaptain J.W. Fritz Testimony:
Mr. BALL. Did you go directly to a building?
Mr. FRITZ. Directly to the Texas School Book Depository Building.
Mr. BALL. What time did you arrive there?
Mr. FRITZ. Well, sir; we arrived there—we arrived at the hospital at 12:45, if you want that time, and at the scene of the offense at 12:58.

Third Floor and Municipal Building and Municipal Building basement Annex video and film images:
Virtually all of the moving (motion) images of Lee Harvey Oswald that exist were photographed within the Municipal Building or the Municipal Building Annex.  Most of these “film clips” were shot on the third floor.  The one and a half-minute “Midnight press conference” interview was shot in the Municipal Building basement Assembly Room.  The images of Lee Harvey Oswald being transferred and shot (murdered) were taken from within the confines of the Municipal Building Annex basement ramp area, as were the last images of Lee Harvey Oswald alive as he was being moved on the ambulance stretcher.  The only other motion picture film of Lee Harvey Oswald in the Municipal Building was taken through the glass windows of the basement Jail Office as Oswald was being transferred to the basement departure ramp.

Most of the original motion film footage has been duplicated, copied and diced and spliced together to create various montages of Lee Harvey Oswald that serve the agendas of those that created these composites.  It is clear that often those that created these montages were not themselves aware of either where or when the original footage was filmed – the events of that 48 hours were too rapid and intense and often the primary news focus was on events in Washington D.C. involving Jackie, Caroline and LBJ.  The nation was distracted as the last accoutrements of a relatively free country were being laid to rest in Dallas, the new capital west of Washington.

The first key in unraveling the footage is to determine what Lee Harvey Oswald was allowed to wear.  The images of November 22, 1963 (including the midnight interview) show Oswald in a white T-Shirt and an open (apparently darker) shirt with a collar.  The Saturday images (November 23, 1963) show that the shirt has been removed from Oswald and he is allowed to wear a white T-Shirt only.  On the day of his death he is given a dark pullover sweater to wear that covers most of his upper body and makes the gun of Jack Ruby hard to see.  It is like the street wear of the Homicide Bureau, the trademark white Texas style cowboy hats; it’s all scripted and the wardrobe people were called in.

Lee Harvey Oswald wearing his November 22nd trademark shirt for the last time:

Video of the Midnight press conference held in the Municipal Building basement Assembly Room begins at 3:08 and ends at 4:37 (1.5 minutes total).

Lee Harvey Oswald dressed in his November 24th trademark “death” black while his Dallas guardian is dressed in contrasting white:

Video of Saturday announcement to return by 10:00 a.m. on Sunday at 6:38  – 7:03.

.most memorable event of November 24th would center on the Dallas Municipal Building Annex, built immediately adjacent to the beaux arts building in (or circa) 1954.The events of the day, November 24, 1963, are centered on the (Dallas) Municipal Building and about six minutes of time in the (Dallas) 

On the trail of when and where this statement was made and where in the Warren Commission Report it can be found, if it was included in the report.

The most famous Lee Harvey Oswald line was, “I am just a patsy.”  This is the last sentence in Oswald’s first meeting with the press.  The interview occurs on the Third Floor of the (Dallas) Municipal Building (aka: “Dallas Police Headquarters“) while Lee Harvey Oswald is being moved through a “hallway” that is filled with various reporters from the news media.

The footage was apparently shot by NBC News.  The original footage was “Reel 3” of a 16mm black and white film product.  There is no indication of the time of day that this footage was filmed.

OSWALD IN CUSTODY (REELS 3 & 4 OF 13)
R3: CU TOP OF ENTRANCE POLICE & COURTS BUILDING. OSWALD WITH POLICE COMES OUT OF ROOM. RPTRS ASK QUESTIONS AS HE WALKS. OSWALD SAYS HE NEEDS LEGAL REPRESENTATION BUT THE POLICE OFFICERS WONT LET ME HAVE ANY. I DONT KNOW WHAT THIS IS ALL ABOUT. I WORK IN THAT BUILDING. NATURALLY I WAS IN THE BUILDING SINCE I WORK THERE. IM JUST A PATSY.

“I am just a patsy.” Video begins at 4:24 and ends at 5:00 minutes).

Oswald:
I’d like some legal representation but these police officers have not allowed me to, to have any. I, uh, I don’t know what this is all about.
Reporter (off camera):
Did you kill the president?
Oswald:
No, sir, I didn’t. People keep asking me that. Sir?
Reporter (off camera):
Did you shoot the president?
Oswald:
I work in that building.
Reporter (off camera):
Were you in that building at the time?
Oswald:
Naturally, if I work in that building, yes, sir.
Reporter (off camera):
Back up man (or ma’am).
Reporter (off camera):
Did you shoot the president?
Oswald:
No, they’ve taken me in because of the fact that I lived in the Soviet Union.  I’m just a patsy.

It is unclear whether the Warren Commission Report even contains this critical statement by Oswald.  The report does describe the third floor of the (Dallas) Municipal Building where the Dallas Police Department had various offices and the various Bureaus of the Dallas Police Department were physically located:
The third floor diagram, the Warren Commission descriptions, and common sense clearly demonstrate that when Oswald was moved on the third floor it was between the two points of the Jail Elevator that opened onto the Third Floor Lobby and the door to the Homicide / Robbery Bureau Offices, a total distance of about 30 feet.

The footage for the “I am just a patsy” film clip was shot with the camera looking EAST as Lee Harvey Oswald was being moved from the Third Floor (Police Department) Lobby (the Jail Elevator) to the Homicide / Robbery Bureau OfficesThis means the film footage was taken at one of four times, as described in the

Warren Commission Report – Page 198 – 2nd paragraph:
After about 15 or 20 minutes Oswald was ushered into the office of Captain Fritz for the first of several interrogation sessions. 

At 4:05 p.m. he was taken to the basement assembly room for his first lineup.  While waiting outside the lineup room, Oswald was searched, and five cartridges and other items were removed from his pockets. 

After the lineup, at about 4 :20, Oswald was returned to Captain Fritz’ office for further questioning. 

Two hours later, at 6:20 p.m., Oswald was taken downstairs for a second lineup and returned to Captain Fritz’ office within 15 minutes (6:35 p.m.) for additional interrogation. 

Shortly after 7 p.m., Captain Fritz signed a complaint charging Oswald with the murder of Patrolman Tippit

Oswald was formally arraigned, i.e., advised of the charges, at 7:10 p.m., before Justice of the Peace David L. Johnston, who came to Captain Fritz’ office for the occasion.

The Warren Commission Report does NOT record the time of the THIRD TRIP from Captain Fritz’ Office to the elevator, however it was probably about 7:30 p.m.

After a third lineup at about 7:40 p.m., Oswald was returned to Fritz’ office. 

About an hour later, after further questioning, Oswald’s fingerprints and palmprints were taken and a paraffin test administered in Fritz’ office, after which the questioning resumed. 

At 11:26 p.m. Fritz signed the complaint charging Oswald with the murder of President Kennedy. 

Shortly after midnight, detectives took Oswald to the basement assembly room for an appearance of several minutes before members of the press.

So, WE still do not know during which of the four press encounters it was that the “patsy” statement was made; but, we have noticed something else:

It is notable by this rather precise and detailed description of time and events that at no time in the 10 hours in police custody on November 22, 1963 was Lee Harvey Oswald given an opportunity to eat.  According to the descriptions provided in the Warren Commission Report Lee Harvey Oswald had not eaten since approximately 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 21st, 24 hours earlier.  It would be very difficult to believe that if Lee Harvey Oswald had NOT eaten for this period of time that he would not have added that grievance to his statements to reporters.

If he HAD eaten lunch at the time (12:15 p.m.) that he had stated, then the issue of food would not have been so pressing.  So what did Lee Harvey Oswald eat?  The answer is made clear by the testimony of his wife:

1.  217 O — 64 — vol. I —5 & 6

Mr. RANKIN. Do you know what his ordinary lunch was?
Mrs. OSWALD. Peanut butter sandwich, cheese sandwich, some lettuce, and he would buy himself a hamburger, something else, a coke.
Mr. RANKIN. And what about his evening meal?  Do you know what he ate in the evening meal?
Mrs. OSWALD. Usually meat, vegetables, fruit, dessert.
Mr. RANKIN. Where would he have that?

Mrs. OSWALD. He loved bananas. They were inexpensive.
The place where he rented a room, he could not cook there.  He said that there was some sort of a care across the street and that he ate there.
Mr. RANKIN. Did he ever tell you what he paid for his evening meal?
Mrs. OSWALD.  About a dollar, $1.30.
Mr. RANKIN. What about his breakfast? Do you know what he had for breakfast ordinarily?
Mrs. OSWALD. He never had breakfast. He just drank coffee and that is all.

So were there signs of “a hamburger” in the stomach or intestines of Lee Harvey Oswald when his autopsy was performed just a little over 48 hours after the question about “where he ate lunch” and “if he ate lunch”.  No, the autopsy failed to look into that.  The experts were more interested in obtaining slices of his brain.

There are three “down the hall” tapes.  The THIRD TAPE was filmed on Saturday, November 23, 1963 The ” tape refers to “bringing Oswald down the hallway again”.  “I don’t know what dispatches you people have been given, but I emphatically deny these charges”.

Video of first transfer to Homicide Bureau Office 3:50 – 4:10
The SECOND TAPE, “I didn’t shoot anybody”.

Video from INSIDE the BASEMENT Jail Elevator area starts at 2:28 and continues through 3:22 – 1 minute from arrival of elevator to first horn honk signaling the opening of the garage area hallway door.

Video of the ambulance arriving and leaving.

2012.03.04 – 18:50.

The suspect, a Mr. Lee Harvey Oswald, aged 24, was in police custody.  He was being held at the Dallas Police Department, one of several municipal (city) departments located in 

Of course one would not have known these things at the time, or even after reading the Warren Commission Report.   The focus in the news and in the report was on “the police headquarters” and “the jail” and later “the Police and Courts Building” and the names of the police men who had the suspected assassin in secure and safe custody until something suddenly happened to dispel the complacency of those that believed in law and order, good police work and justice, and that the “truth would out” (at least in the lifetimes of those that were witnesses to the history).

I was fourteen years of age at the time.  I lived in Nevada.  I was a sophomore in High School and made my “living” by selling newspapers every day after school.  I had more than a passing interest in both politics and the news.

I had never been to Dallas.  I was dependent on the descriptions, the diagrams and maps, the images that the media sent me in my effort to picture or to visualize what was happening in the world with Dallas as the lens.  The lens (that day) showed this:

Lee Harvey Oswald is shot.  For those watching television that morning in Nevada it was an opportunity to witness “the first live murder ever broadcast on television”.  I did not see it live.  Lee Harvey Oswald did not die in the basement garage of the Dallas Municipal Building Annex.  He died away from the lenses of the cameras, in Parkland Memorial Hospital where his second child had been born just 35 days earlier.

If one believes the Warren Commission Report it was by the most amazing of occurrences that Lee Harvey Oswald died.  Had Jack Ruby entered the basement garage just 30 seconds later he would have not been able to shoot Oswald.  Had the police lined up as instructed the attempt would have failed.  Had there been even two guards at the Main Street entrance to the garage Jack Ruby could never had gotten in.  Had the one guard, Officer Roy Eugene Vaughn, not been distracted by the police car driven by Lieutenant Rio S. Pierce Jack Ruby could not have slipped into the garage.

What is amazing is that neither the Warren Commission nor most of the press seemed to be versed in even the most basic of geography.  While the Municipal Building is clearly identified as such on three sides of the building the Warren Commission consistently uses alternate descriptions and names.  It would be like using “Press Secretary” instead of the term “White House” to refer to news regarding the Executive Branch in Washington D.C.